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"Every spring," she told me solemnly at last, "every spring Betty and I 
used to climb up in the trees on our place, and sit very quiet for hours 

and hours to watch the birds build their nests! Why, I think that's 
wonderful!"


I agreed.

"Now, there's just one other point, said I. "How about the leather 

dressing case? Did you ever give her one that could be described as 
'tricky';"


"You must have seen it," was her reply. "It had a sort of double top, so 
you could get at the mirror and toilet articles without opening the 
suitcase part."


"Of course I've seen it," said I. "But I did not know you gave it to 
her."


I returned to the city. Barely had I entered my hotel room when the 

telephone rang. It was Millicent, very much excited.

"Did you notice what KIND of birds they are--painted on the chest? They 

are swallows!"

"What of it?" I wanted to know.


"Why--why--" gasped Millicent, "it was swallows we used to watch building 
their nests. That's why we climbed the trees--to get level with the 

eaves!"





CHAPTER IV


"THIS IS YOUR HERITAGE"


1.

I HAVE said that, in view of Betty's "pervading-presence" demonstration, 

as it might be called, I was not eager for communication from her through 
a psychic "unless she had something to say." I meant that not only as far 
as personal messages to me were concerned, but in a broader sense and a 

wider application. For the world is full of books substantiating the 
existence of the unexplained, and I was no longer interested in 
generalities.


But that first evening with Darby and Joan convinced me, as already 

stated, that Betty did have something to say; something quite the 
opposite of generalities; something not only for those who, in the shock 
of personal loss, have struggled with the weariness of grief, but also 

something for those who, in the dismayed bewilderment of seemingly 
unwarranted failure, out of their despair ask that final, most 
disheartening of questions: "What's the use?"


And so, before I set down further evidence of Betty's authentication of 
herself, and of the individuality and continuity of that self, I think I 

should tell you why Betty had something to say; why--to quote her--"I am 
permitted to bring you this divulgence," at this particular time. And 
also to tell you something of its present aim and need.






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