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she had met him on earth."


* The personality who gave most of the material for Our Unseen Guest.

Betty and I had first met Darby and Joan at the house of Margaret 

Cameron,* in 1922. With them, and Margaret, and another psychic, Mrs. 
John Palmer Gavitt* we conducted the remarkable series of experiments in 
demonstrating and verifying the "second body"--beta body, we called 

it--described in an appendix to The Betty Book. In the next seventeen 
years we had with Darby and Joan but two other contacts: once when Betty 
went East without me, and once when they visited us at Burlingame for two 

days. Nevertheless, in spite of so few meetings, and in spite of the fact 
that Betty and Joan were doing diametrically opposite kinds of work by 
different methods, the two of them had always "clicked." And they always 

felt that, somehow or another, they were destined to do more good work
together. But they, no more than Darby or myself, realized how perfectly
they were being trained, each in her own way, to combine their methods in

one triumphant effort when the time came.


*Author of The Seven Purposes.
** The "Mrs. Gaines" of The Betty Book.


3.

These two were among the friendships I had come East to renew. 

Nevertheless, my interest was not in the possibility of getting in verbal 
touch with Betty. I must repeat, I did not NEED verbal touch with Betty. 
I would not seek it, unless I were convinced that she really had 

something to say beside greeting and chit chat! and my opinion then was 
that her serious work had been rounded out, had reached its culmination. 
So I wrote it down in the chapter "I Bear Witness," added to Across the 

Unknown after she had died. "This [the demonstration of her presence], I 
now believe, is the 'great blossom' of which the Invisibles spoke; the 
final significance to which all of Betty's twenty years of work was to 

lead. Here is her concrete proof of one reward that can come to those who 
follow in her footsteps, her final evidence that her instrument of twenty 
years' forging is strong enough to stand the supreme test." Unconsciously 

I think I was just a little afraid of weakening the perfection of that 
demonstration of her actual and continuing presence: I was inclined to 
let well enough alone.


My first evening with Darby and Joan swept that particular fog out of my 
head. Betty had something to say: and she said just enough to prove to us 

that all of her previous work, and all of Joan's previous work, and 
before that the work of Margaret Cameron--who was one of the first 
Americans to make a nation-wide psychical stir outside professional 

research circles--were really a necessary preliminary foundation to what 
she was going to be able to tell us now, from her present point of view.


In all this business of alleged communication across the border, the 
question of identification has always been the focus both of 

investigation and of opposition. When a man calls you up on the 
telephone, saying he is John Smith, and the matter is important, you want 
him first of all to prove to you that he is who he says he is. The best 

way he can do it is to tell you something that only you and he know. 
That, transferred to psychical research, is what is called evidential 
material, or simply "evidential."


So important it is, from the point of view of research, that the great 
bulk of psychic investigation has been in the direction of obtaining and 

analyzing evidential. The task has proved to be one of extraordinary




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