Page 6 - The.Tao.of.Ching.Way.to.Divination
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6
The Tao Of I-Ching
Introduction 7






57.
Sun — Wind 368




58.
Dui — Lake ......................................................... 
373




59.
Huan — Dispersion............................................ 377





60.
_—
Ji — Bamboo joint ............................................ 382




't' Zhongf̆ — Central sincerity ..........................
61.
r
386





62.
d~
Xiaoguo Small passing................................. 391





63.
—=
Jiji — Finished.................................................... 396



It is my intention that this book will encourage students to pursue a 

64.
Weiji — Unfinished...................... 400
course of self-development and to study life and nature, as it was the 

pursuit and study of these things that led to the creation of the I Ching 

in the first place. Most English translations of the I Ching emphasize 


academic approach and therefore highlight the Judgments of the 64 

hexagrams and their individual lines or Yao. In such books, divination is 

simplistically explained and the student uses coins or yarrow stalks to 

derive a reading consisting of general advice with respect to the hexagrams 


and lines selected.

Although students using the I Ching in such a manner may receive 

useful information and advice, the reading is very often general and 

composed of archaic language. More often, students are left with doubts 


regarding proper interpretation and cannot use their own intelligence 

to determine the true meaning. In addition, serious students have 

unanswered questions, such as the following:



"How were the hexagrams derived and their meaning 

determined?


What is Yin and Yang and what relation do these con- 

cepts have to the hexagrams?



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