Page 20 - Earth Mother Crying
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The Bureau of Meteorology's weather observer in Ceduna, Mark Bedson, says the 
black rain came down during thunderstorms across Eyre Peninsula early Saturday. 

,



He says it was a very strange experience. ,


"I went and had a cup of coffee and poured the water in the cup and thought hang

on and poured it out, I am not going to drink it." ,


"So I have emptied the water tank and washed my roof, we are not quite sure what 

it is.",

Source: - from http://www.abc.net.au/news/state/sa/metsa-9oct2000-12.htm,

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METEOR MAY PROVE ABORIGINAL LEGEND, 

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A LEGEND RECOUNTED BY ABORIGINES SPEAKS OF A DEVASTATING 
"WHITE WAVE" FALLING OUT OF THE SKY... ,



In 1975, Aboriginal elders gathered in Canberra, with 350 of their people, and 

warned of disasters to come, followed by a time when humankind would go back to 
its beginnings -- with all cultures existing as one. ,



At the gathering a strong message against the mining industry was formed, based on 

their belief that underground minerals are a vital part of the planet's energy grid 
and that mining is disturbing this grid. Aborigines believe that each tribe has a 

responsibility to take care of its own part of the world. ,



One disaster recounted in Aboriginal legends, speaks of a "white wave" falling out 
of the sky and devastating their culture. Until now, historians had linked the legend 

with the arrival of white settlers but according to Professor Ted Bryant, geologist at 

the University of Wollongong in New South Wales, a vast tsunami would give the 

impression of a white wave falling out of the sky. And Bryant has found strong 
evidence that a tsunami struck the coast of New South Wales in the late 18th 

Century -- and a meteor is seen as the most likely culprit. ,



Professor Bryant analyzed sediment and boulders along the coast, and says they are 
consistent with a tsunami hundreds of feet high, striking at a speed greater than 200 

miles per hour. There is additional evidence for tsunamis hitting Lord Howe Island 

in the mid-Tasman Sea, along the north Queensland coast, and along the northwest 

coast of Western Australia. At the latter location, there is good evidence that a 
recent wave swept more than 20 miles inland, topping 200-foot hills more than a










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