Page 21 - TheCorpusHermeticum
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The Corpus Hermeticum




1. Whither stumble ye, sots, who have sopped up the wine of ignorance and can so far not carry it that ye 
already even spew it forth?



Stay ye, be sober, gaze upwards with the [true] eyes of the heart! And if ye cannot all, yet ye at least who 
can!



For that the ill of ignorance doth pour o`er all the earth and overwhelm the soul that's battened down within 
the body, preventing it from fetching port within Salvation's harbors.



2. Be ye then not carried off by the fierce flood, but using the shore−current ye who can, make for Salvation's 
port, and, harboring there, seek ye for one to take you by the hand and lead you unto Gnosis' gates.



Where shines clear Light, of every darkness clean; where not a single soul is drunk, but sober all they gaze 
with their hearts' eyes on Him who willeth to be seen.



No ear can hear Him, nor can eye see Him, nor tongue speak of Him, but [only] mind and heart.


But first thou must tear off from thee the cloak which thou dost wear − the web of ignorance, the ground of 

bad, corruption's chain, the carapace of darkness, the living death, sensation's corpse, the tomb thou carriest 
with thee, the robber in thy house, who through the things he loveth, hateth thee, and through the things he 

hateth, bears thee malice.


3. Such is the hateful cloak thou wearest − that throttles thee [and holds thee] down to it, in order that thou 

may'st not gaze above, and having seen the Beauty of the Truth, and Good that dwells therein, detest the bad 

of it; having found out the plot that it hath schemed against thee, by making void of sense those seeming 
things which men think senses.



For that it hath with mass of matter blocked them up and crammed them full of loathsome lust, so that thou 
may'st not hear about the things that thou should'st hear, nor see the things thou should'st see.



VIII. That No One of Existing Things doth Perish, but Men in 

Error Speak of Their Changes as Destructions and as 


Deaths



1. [Hermes:] Concerning Soul and Body, son, we now must speak; in what way Soul is deathless, and whence 

comes the activity in composing and dissolving Body.


For there's no death for aught of things [that are]; the thought this word conveys, is either void of fact, or 

[simply] by the knocking off a syllable what is called "death", doth stand for "deathless".


For death is of destruction, and nothing in the Cosmos is destroyed. For if Cosmos is second God, a life that 

cannot die, it cannot be that any part of this immortal life should die. All things in Cosmos are parts of 
Cosmos, and most of all is man, the rational animal.



2. For truly first of all, eternal and transcending birth, is God the universals' Maker. Second is he "after His 
image", Cosmos, brought into being by Him, sustained and fed by Him, made deathless, as by his own Sire, 

living for aye, as ever free from death.






VIII. That No One of Existing Things doth Perish, but Men in Error Speak of Their Changes as D1e9struction




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