Page 10 - TheCorpusHermeticum
P. 10



The Corpus Hermeticum




2. H: Is not, again, this cosmos vast, [so vast] that than it there exists no body greater? 


A: Assuredly.


H: And massive, too, for it is crammed with multitudes of other mighty frames, nay, rather all the other 

bodies that there are?


A: It is.



H: And yet the cosmos is a body? 


A: It is a body.


H: And one that's moved?



3. A: Assuredly.


H: Of what size, then, must be the space in which it's moved, and of what kind [must be] the nature [of that 

space]? Must it not be far vaster [than the cosmos], in order that it may be able to find room for its continued 
course, so that the moved may not be cramped for want of room and lose its motion?



A: Something, Thrice−greatest one, it needs must be, immensely vast.


4. H: And of what nature? Must it not be, Asclepius, of just the contrary? And is not contrary to body 

bodiless?


A: Agreed.


H: Space, then, is bodiless. But bodiless must either be some godlike thing or God [Himself]. And by "some 

godlike thing" I mean no more the generable [i.e., that which is generated] but the ingenerable.


5. If, then, space be some godlike thing, it is substantial; but if 'tis God [Himself], it transcends substance. But 

it is to be thought of otherwise [than God], and in this way.


God is first "thinkable" for us, not for Himself, for that the thing that's thought doth fall beneath the thinker's 

sense. God then cannot be "thinkable" unto Himself, in that He's thought of by Himself as being nothing else 

but what He thinks. But he is "something else" for us, and so He's thought of by us.


6. If space is, therefore, to be thought, [it should] not, [then, be thought as] God, but space. If God is also to 

be thought, [He should] not [be conceived] as space, but as energy that can contain [all space].


Further, all that is moved is moved not in the moved but in the stable. And that which moves [another] is of 

course stationary, for 'tis impossible that it should move with it.


A: How is it, then, that things down here, Thrice−greatest one, are moved with those that are [already] 

moved? For thou hast said the errant spheres were moved by the inerrant one.


H: This is not, O Asclepius, a moving with, but one against; they are not moved with one another, but one 

against the other. It is this contrariety which turneth the resistance of their motion into rest. For that resistance 
is the rest of motion.




II. To Asclepius 8




   8   9   10   11   12